Who are you guys?

2014 nissan qashqai 4x4 system



Purchased our 14 Pathfinder about two months ago and used the 4 wheel lock pretty sparingly.
Once the weather turned to crap and we need the 4 wheel lock, it will only stay in lock for short periods of time and we cannot put in lock unless the vehicle is stopped.
The roads we are on are bad so I know there is wheel slippage and we're not going fast.
Is this normal?

I'm pretty sure that you can put it in lock if you're driving slow. The system will automatically disable "lock" if you exceed a certain speed and revert to "auto". This is to prevent damage to your differentials.

Purchased our 14 Pathfinder about two months ago and used the 4 wheel lock pretty sparingly.
Once the weather turned to crap and we need the 4 wheel lock, it will only stay in lock for short periods of time and we cannot put in lock unless the vehicle is stopped.
The roads we are on are bad so I know there is wheel slippage and we're not going fast.
Is this normal?

The LOCK mode is only meant to be used when you are completely stuck, at a standstill. The AUTO mode should be used in just about every other circumstance. Leaving it in LOCK at higher speeds will cause binding, particularly during turns, and can damage your drivetrain.

The AUTO mode is not an entirely reactive mode as you may think. It will apply a certain amount of power to the rear wheels when you start from a complete stop each time. It will also sense slippage and apply power appropriately at other times. The system works quite well, even in deep snow.

Current: 2016 Toyota Highlander XLE in Predawn Gray Mica with Ash leather

Former: 2013 Nissan Pathfinder SL Premium in Dark Slate with Charcoal leather

2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium in Venetian Red Pearl with Black cloth interior

I could not find in the manual where it says - the vehicle must be stopped; could you please tell me what page?
I realize the auto mode shifts the power to the back wheels and doesn't do a bad job, but that's not 4 wheel drive.
It says this vehicle is 4 wheel drive and even when the roads are horrible, the pathfinder didn't stay in 4 wheel lock. I live pretty rural and wanted 4 wheel drive or all wheel drive - not what I got. Pretty mis-leading.

It says this vehicle is 4 wheel drive and even when the roads are horrible, the pathfinder didn't stay in 4 wheel lock. I live pretty rural and wanted 4 wheel drive or all wheel drive - not what I got. Pretty mis-leading.

Unfortunately auto manufacturers have gotten pretty liberal with their use of the terms "AWD" and "4WD", to the point where they really have no concrete definition. The 2013+ Pathfinder's setup is pretty typical of other crossover SUVs of its ilk. It does not use the traditional transfer case/differential setup that most of us have come to understand as "4 wheel drive". Rather, it uses a clutch pack that is not meant to engage the rear wheels full time. It is a primarily FWD vehicle, that can engage the rear wheels when it determines additional traction is needed. This is done for fuel efficiency and to decrease cost. That said, the system is really quite capable if you just "set it and forget it".

Current: 2016 Toyota Highlander XLE in Predawn Gray Mica with Ash leather

Former: 2013 Nissan Pathfinder SL Premium in Dark Slate with Charcoal leather

2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium in Venetian Red Pearl with Black cloth interior

It says this vehicle is 4 wheel drive and even when the roads are horrible, the pathfinder didn't stay in 4 wheel lock. I live pretty rural and wanted 4 wheel drive or all wheel drive - not what I got. Pretty mis-leading.

I believe that four wheel drive is part time or auto (like Hondas and most 4wd vehicles). All wheel drive is all time four wheel drive (like Subaru, I believe).

All time four wheel drive is less fuel efficient and also provides little to no additional benefit. It seems that this is becoming completely obsolete due to advances in auto 4wd and increasing fuel efficiency requirements.

I haven't seen any printed material from Nissan that claims the 4wd Pathfinder is all time 4wd or AWD, so I don't see what is misleading about the literature or marketing.

Thanks for your replies, but the pathfinder is not a 4 wheel drive vehicle.
This being my first Nissan, I did research and no where does it say the 4 wheel lock feature is for just a few minutes.
4 wheels drive is just that, Honda older pathfinders, Toyotas - 4 wheel drive is just that. This mis-leading and mis-representative of a product.
I double checked and it does say 4x4 on the back of the car and all the literature - which it is not.
Imagine buying a Subaru or Audi and expecting an all wheel drive only to learn - no silly it's all wheel front wheel drive.

Please Don't get me wrong the pathfinder is a very nice vehicle; the ride handling, interior is all nice, bit I wanted a 4 wheel drive or an all wheel drive.
I did not get what I was expecting and I'm will to bet a lot of people do. to know of this either.

You are operating under the false supposition that "four wheel drive", "4WD", "AWD" and other designations hold a hard, fast definition - and that is that all four wheels are being powered all of the time. This is simply not the case as I've pointed out more than once. There are many different systems that use these terms and not all of them are the same.

You are also operating under the false supposition that all four wheels must be powered in order to provide maximum capability under poor traction situations, that is also not true.

There are many vehicles on the market, particularly in this segment (i.e. minivan on steroids), that use an electronically controlled, clutch pack much like the Pathfinder's. The Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander, Ford Explorer, the GM large crossovers (Acadia, Traverse, Enclave, Outlook, etc), all use a similar system and all of them either use the designation "4WD" or "AWD".

If you wanted a traditional 4WD system, you'd have been better advised to look at traditional truck-based SUVs, though there are few of them left on the market. The Toyota 4Runner, the Nissan Xterra, Ford Expedition, Nissan Armada, Chevy Tahoe and others use a system more like what you were expecting in the Pathfinder. They also aren't going to be nearly as flexible in terms of seating, creature comforts or nearly as fuel efficient - these are tradeoffs that you must consider as an educated consumer.

I don't mean to sound pedantic, but when you make statements like "the pathfinder is not a 4 wheel drive vehicle", it makes me think that you don't quite understand the market or the nature of the systems you're describing.

Current: 2016 Toyota Highlander XLE in Predawn Gray Mica with Ash leather

Former: 2013 Nissan Pathfinder SL Premium in Dark Slate with Charcoal leather

2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium in Venetian Red Pearl with Black cloth interior